Break in on Trilby Road

trilby-rd
most-wanted

#1

Hi everyone - Chris suggested I posted here. If it helps find the perpetrator then that would be amazing, but if it helps anyone avoid a similar experience, then that would be fantastic.
Our house on Trilby Road was broken into last Thursday around 6pm. We have a Canary camera, and it sent me a notification that a person was in our kitchen. It has a siren which I hit, then called the police who were there within minutes.
He forced the upstairs bathroom sash window open (having tried the kitchen sash which has security stop bolts) after climbing on a utility room extension.
We were really lucky, we cannot identify anything taken so far.

The police said they expected he was looking for money and jewellery, of which there was none. He ignored ipad, kindle, laptop which was a bit strange. He basically left us with a mess.

If something positive can come as a result then these are the things that I’ve learned…

  • The camera alerted me, and maybe the siren scared him
  • The police reacted so quickly - I guess it’s rare to be alerted to an active burglary
  • The patio furniture enabled his entrance and exit.
  • Security bolts on the kitchen window prevented him opening that window more than 5 inches (bathroom didn’t have them, but does now!)

We were really lucky.
Please do share from social media - the facebook and twitter post under my name is public and shareable.
Here’s the footage of him… Looks like he’s got a mobility boot on.


#2

Thanks for sharing, @gc_hq and sorry to hear about this break-in.

We have a Canary cam too, and it’s good to know that the siren is a successful deterrent, and that the police response is speedy. I’m sure someone here, or one of our followers on social media will be able to identify this man. Perhaps someone who works for Lewisham Hospital or a local clinic, given that he’s wearing a foot brace (breaking into people’s houses is clearly hazardous on the lower body)

Fingers crossed they find this low-life.


#3

Out of interest do you have alarms on door and Windows?


#4

No, we had motion sensor solar lights which he had dismantled in a previous visit (they were in the flower beds), and then the Canary which is a motion activated camera


#5

Really sorry to hear about the break-in!

I live on Kemble road, so will keep an eye out for you. I have also shared on my facebook.


#6

Would strongly advise someone who works for Lewisham Hospital or a local clinic not to breach patient confidentiality if they did recognise them.


#7

I’m learning - forgive my inorance.
So, would a paedophile killer, for instance, be protected by patient confidentiality if he walked into a hospital?
I mean, would a nurse, or the hospital, be prosecuted for identifying him to the police?


#8

It’s an interesting question. No - the risk of ‘serious crime’ outweighs the right to confidentiality. I’m not sure it’s ever been tested in court but the NHS code of practice on confidentiality states
“The definition of serious crime is not entirely clear. Murder, manslaughter, rape, treason, kidnapping, child abuse or other cases where individuals have suffered serious harm may all warrant breaching confidentiality. Serious harm to the security of the state or to public order and crimes that involve substantial financial gain or loss will also generally fall within this category. In contrast, theft, fraud or damage to property where loss or damage is less substantial would generally not warrant breach of confidence.“

There’s also provision in the Road Traffic Act and the Terrorism Act regarding disclosure of requested by police.


#9

Thank you for taking the time to explain that to me Katie.


#10

We know of a spate of robberies in a fairly small community in Scotland, all of which have targeted cash and jewellery and ignored iPads, etc.

Is this because jewellery is easier to sell than electronic devices that have serial numbers or “track my device” turned on?

I’m really sorry you’ve had the intrusion but thank you for sharing details of your security arrangements. That’s very helpful.