Lewisham Gateway development


#1

https://www.lewisham.gov.uk/inmyarea/regeneration/lewishamtowncentre/Pages/lewisham-gateway.aspx

LewishamGatewayPhaseA
An artist’s impression of ‘Building B’ overlooking Confluence Place

Posts split from another topic:


Extension of ULEZ to South Circular in Oct 2021
#2

If Khan’s so keen on improving air quality he should take notice of the tweets I keep sending about the appalling conditions at Bullock’s vanity project the so-called Lewisham Gateway. The traffic congestion is appalling, partly because of constant building works, partly because the new traffic system TfL put in place was obviously designed by someone who’s never been there. There are two more building projects being tweaked, one of which, next to the station, will continue to block access to the shopping centre from the stations, and should really be made over to a green area for wildlife. Then a piece of land designated as sensitive to high rise will surely be agreed by our “representatives” for a 15 storey block and a huge amount of lower rise right next to the river and disturbing/destroying what small amounts of wildlife have managed to hang on in this concrete desert. No one even considers green roofs on the towers. If you care about this part of the borough not becoming a heap of overpriced buy-to-let with no provision for families when people outgrow the flats, and full of people who add nothing to the area except overcrowded public transport, please add your voices to my lone one.


#3

I share your concerns about overcrowding in London. However, to keep this topic on-topic, I may need to move your post into a dedicated topic if others would like to discuss the Lewisham Gateway project. [now split]


#4

I have no problem with a new subject being opened. Let’s face it, the nightmare here has a knock-on effect across the borough. We have a FB page about the Silver Road development, but otherwise we only have NextDoor, which is nowhere as good as your site. And the air quality problem is horrendous across our main roads. It’s not as if air doesn’t move around…


#5

Just to pick one quote from what to me reads much like a general lash out… (sorry ChrisBeach to stay off-topic)

Who exactly are you referring to here, City workers, foreigners, people from north of the river, any other strangers?

I agree that the quality of new developments and even road schemes in the area regrettably isn’t exactly as good as it could be (e.g. poor provision for cycling, and I’m not a cyclist; the failure to get developers paying for bringing the train station up to scratch), but I can’t see what is wrong with the principle of regenerating an area that up until now could be hardly described as a Garden of Eden. The fact that regeneration only works the way it does in this country is one for discussion in a different thread…


#6

Principally, wherever they originate, the apartment block residents use Lewisham as a dormitory. They don’t use the shops, for example - the new Asda isn’t doing nearly as well as expected. The ground floors are mostly not let. The shopping centre is not easily accessible now and with the further development will only be worse. Commuters say the trains and DLR are beyond capacity. The area hasn’t been regenerated, it’s been ruined. It needs proper, affordable, social housing. Actual houses with actual gardens, for families. Not hideous light-blocking towers and concrete as far as the eye can see with no room for wildlife. Where will the people in the flats move to when they need family homes? The post-war experiment of dumping families high up in tower blocks was a miserable failure that turned the buildings into slums. As for trying to make me out as a racist or jingoist, I thought this forum was above mudslinging. But as you seem to like trading insults, let me say that anyone who thinks the mayor’s vision is an improvement on anything that went before didn’t see what went before. And I mean before the disgusting roundabout. Or they are totally without any kind of taste or judgment. Out of respect for Chris and the generally decent, pleasant people on this forum, I won’t go any further than to say that you’ve dragged it down to the level NextDoor was at when it first took over Streetlife.


#7

I dont quite agree with the statement. I was in Roterdam last year and what was expected to be a city with long history and relevant architecture, turned out to be a fantastic morden megapolis with mostly high rise blocks, the city was in ruins after WW2. The problem is not in high rise buildings, the problem is in totally unprofessional government bodies who are trying to apply smth that does not fit the area at all.

I was in Kidbrooke buying a Christmas tree and saw huge sites with new high blocks of flats. They looked fantastic, lots of space around for many future good things like playgrounds, parks

High rise buildings are for large space areas, you cannot squeeze them in tiny spaces between old buildings making them out of architectural character. If lay people like us know it and government decision makers dont see it, i do wonder if they fit their positions.

Roterdam:


#8

Kat, this part of London, and more especially Deptford, were severely damaged during WW2, but the Council did even worse damage, of which tower blocks were a major part. Also the wrenching apart of communities. This is something I lived through, and the appalling effects are well documented. (Try watching the History of Our Streets on Deptford High Street.) So ultimately it is not a matter of opinion. Damaged tower block communal areas, urine-soaked lifts, ruined views (I remember the view from Greenwich before the “development” of the Isle of Dogs. I grew up in a house similar to the one I now live in, but it was pulled down as a slum. All it and its neighbours needed was the kind of work this street received. The community was dispersed, support systems lost. Lewisham is not Rotterdam. And it’s not the young who are pushing these developments, but the rich, who want to get richer off the backs of ordinary working stiffs in need of a home. On top of all that, the wildlife is being giving no home. Little scraps not joined up cannot support the variety of birds trying to recolonise the Ravensbourne. One peregrine on the former Citibank Tower is not a resurgence but an isolated happenstance. The actual building work is polluting and disruptive. Is this what you want for your future? My 90+ year old neighbour is scared to come out of hospital. We know what’s being lost. Follow @Harryslaststand to understand how history is repeating itself in the worst possible ways.


#9

That was exactly my point. But i would not blame the highrise blocks because with the correct approach and city concept, it can be a fantastic place to live. Rotterdam is a prime example. But Lewisham, and not only, but the whole England are not Rotterdam and Netherlands, the building style is different and sticking highrise housing complexes in the middle of countryside like small streets with small houses, overpopulated on the top of that, is very stupid. I am not sure what those people are thinking.


#10

My husband worked on the tower blocks etc that now have residents & he said that a percentage of them are social housing. I agree about with what has been said about tower blocks & we did watch history if our steeets…I also agree with what was said about the programme. But, unfortunately London is hugely over populated, & it seems the only way to accommodate everyone is to build these towers.
Before I get shot down, I’m not saying that it’s rught either. Both our children have been lucky enough to buy a flat with their partners, but not where they wanted to live originally. Our son lives in Beckenham, but our daughter has bought a fairly new build in Crayford. So the other option, if you don’t want to live in a polluted built up area is to move out of central London & I don’t mean just buy, as I know the Council are keen to re-house families out of London to reduce over crowding.


#11

The latest proposed development is Silver Road, off Elmira Street. It’s a site between the railway line and the river, which is prone to flooding and subsidence, and is designated “sensitive” to high rise development because it will tower above the railway line and the terraced houses on the other side. We’ve all been suffering from the ongoing building for years already. There will be over 18,000 vehicle movements past Prendergast Vale school in a 2-year period in a very narrow street. Silver Road has one house; pity those poor people if this happens, with all those lorries thundering past her door every day. Silver Road can only be widened to accommodate them by tearing down her house…or the railway bridge. The amount of social housing is not great, and the problem is the same, where do the residents go when they need to move on? We need social houses rather than social housing. The site could be used for Lewisham’s share of the proposed government fund for new social housing. And if there’s a suggestion here that I should move outside London to avoid this development, I should point out that I was born in Deptford and have lived in my present house for more than 40 years.


#12

I was suggesting that you move out of London at all! All I said was that there is social housing including houses outside London.
You are lucky to have had a house for the last 40 years. I was born in Nunhead & we lived with my grandparents until my parents managed to get a post war flat near Stockwell in 1963 when I was 11! & eventually a 2 bed maisonette that wasn’t that great 7 years later!
I get what you are saying about more social houses for families, but they won’t be for the likes of my children, they couldn’t even if they had wanted to, get on the housing list because they all work & are deemed to earn too much, so they have saved hard & bought a flat, not a house & I suspect that it will be a good few years before they move again, let alone buy a house.


#13

That was meant to say I wasn’t suggesting…


#14

I had no choice but to bankrupt myself buying this house. I was working for GLC Housing watching new flats being built across the road from the damp, rotting flat I was living in, and not eligible for one. I then managed to get a small unfurnished flat that wasn’t actually self-contained and had the bath in the kitchen. I only managed to get this house because it was being sold by the parents of an old school friend. If anything ever needed doing it meant extra mortgage, and it took me most of those 40 years to pay it off. So let’s not play, “Lucky you, unlucky everyone else.” Let’s stop pretending these flats are the answer to anything and reverse Thatcher’s wholesale sell-off of Council Housing.


#15

I think we’re deep in @General_Politics territory now - can I ask all commenters to stick to subject in hand (Lewisham Gateway). Thanks.

Verified members are encouraged to opt in to @General_Politics for in-depth discussion of issues like Right to Buy, and overall trends in council housing.


#16

Yes that’s fair enough :blush: