Riding bikes on pavements

I nearly got hit by a bike careering round a blind corner on the pavement this morning. Is anyone really p****d off with this latest trend? Or is it just the latest trend in a line of annoying behaviour to get the attention they crave? It used to be walking through train carriages, leaving the doors open, or playing music through a tinny mobile phone speaker. None of which are illegal (apart from the riding on pavements) but slightly annoying.
Anyway. Spleen vented. Thanks for listening. It’s a beautiful morning. Have a good day all.

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I’ve noticed another annoying trend : people saying 5 year olds should not be riding on the pavement.

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There’s a correlation between the behaviour you speak of and the decline in the wearing of headwear.
This sort of roguery just didn’t happen when gentleman wore and date I say ladies wore nice, sensible headpieces…FACT.

Maybe it is just me.

@Fish If anything many of those locally who used to ride bikes on pavements without any regard for pedestrians unfortunately seem to have swapped their bikes for e-scooters! This is even worse due to the speed they go at and the fact that they’re so quiet!

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On the bright side, you’ll be able to pick up a cheap scooter when the weather turns rubbish

Nah, they p***s me off too. Not the families with wee kiddies on their bikes, they seem to have the situation under control. It’s the solo adults riding on the paths when the roads are either quiet or wide enough to cater for them and cars, or there is a dedicated bike lane right there with no bikes.

Then there are the ones that ‘ding ding’ at you thinking they’re doing you a favour by warning you that they’re coming, when it’s obvious the only place for you, the pedestrian, to go is the road. A few minutes on the road isn’t going to harm them or their bike. If the path is wide enough for the both of us, then thanks for the warning.

I had a near miss with a cyclist last week, same situation they came speeding around a blind corner. Woman with the latest cycling gear and expensive bike. No apology, just sped off leaving me visibly shaken by whole experience.

I used to be a keen cyclist until I got knocked off my bike by a hit and run driver. I’m definitely not innocent when it comes to riding on the path. I rode on the path when I tried to get my confidence back, so in a way I do empathise with cyclists that are on the paths but please give the pedestrians the right of way.

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Yeah. It was the adults/teenagers I meant. I cycle too and I’ve riden on the pavement occasionally but it’s the attitude of the ‘youths’ that winds me up. Looking for a reaction. It’s antisocial and that’s why they do it.
Then there’s the Lycra adults. No idea why they do it.

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You are right Fish. They choose to ride on the pavement simply because they can. They seek to get up the noses of respectable working stiffs/taxpayers because they want to make some kind of a point, in my view. I can’t remember ever seeing any of the lycra brigade on the pavement, however.

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I’ve seen Lycra brigade on the pavement probably as much as the teenagers. In fact the only time I’ve actually nearly been mown down it was a Lycra brigade member not a teenager! I’m not saying I’ve never cycled on the pavement myself occasionally but I always dismount for pedestrians. I am afraid that when there’s no clear traffic/one way related reason (reason, though not an excuse) why people are on the pavement I always want to laugh and ask them if they’re too scared to go on the road. Obviously I’m too chicken to say it to them!

Tbh I haven’t always found families with young children on the pavement that considerate. But in my day children under 11 weren’t supposed to be on the road (and you had to pass a cycling proficiency test!) so I’d never expect the children themselves to be on the road and I can see that one adult probably does need to be with them because it would be quite hard to cycle in the road alongside the children on the pavement. But I do think the accompanying adults need to show consideration for pedestrians and also teach the children to do so. Then we can all co-exist on the pavements safely.

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We must both cycle in very different parts of the world, then.

I recall regularly riding to primary school a couple of miles along a main road aged 10. There was nothing to say children were not permitted to ride on roads. We cycled everywhere.
Far fewer cars about in those days of course.

And schools encouraged primary children to do cycling proficiency training and test but nobody had to.

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I put forward my own experience. Perhaps we didn’t grow up in the same area.

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Since I have no idea where you live I can’t comment on that. I only commented on my own experience.

I am posting on a local forum. I live here.

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Same here. But I wasn’t the person suggesting we live in different parts of the world.

Maybe I live on the other side of the world too because I’ve seen many of the Lycra brigade on the footpaths of Forest Hill, Outer Mongolia.

You will find the Lycra brigade on the footpath in areas where they want to skip the traffic lights or other stop signs. They’re the biggest problem at the Cranston/Woolstone intersection. If they’re turning right from Cranston Road they cut through the traffic to make that turn on the path rather than wait their turn on the street. They don’t slow down to give way to any pedestrians that may be heading towards Cranston Road along Woolstone Road. That corner is so blind no-one can see what’s round it.

Also encountered them on the path as you head up Catford Hill toward the River Pool Linear Park. It’s easier for them to turn into the Park from the path… and also up by the Sainsbury’s when you exit the Park and they want to head right. And so on and so on.

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Well, you seem to have seen a lot of it and you give specific examples, so fair enough. I accept what you say.

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For me there, in terms of bikes on pavements, a few different issues.

One is where cyclists cycle quickly on narrow pavements, where young children (and or the elderly / hose with mobility problems) can come out of their houses / front gardens unseen - there have been some horrendous collisions and this is the worst and most dangerous form for me. Speed, and weight of bike / person added to no warning for either party makes this really bad. I’d be happy for severe punishments for people who do this.

You then have cyclists cycling quickly on other types of pavements where visibility is better. This can still be dangerous, again for the same groups.

And then you people cycling more slowly which is less dangerous.

All the above are wrong, but to different degrees.

You read or hear quite often that some people will not cycle on the road as they are scared to do so, don’t feel comfortable. Finding a solution to that would stop some people - safer and more cycling lanes and maybe more (or better advertised) cycling on the road type lessons (I think Lewisham and others used to run some?).

You’ll always have some people who just don’t care - they will be the same on a bike, scooter, car etc but if they can become a real minority will be easier to target, and of course the less of them the less potential for accidents.

Finally adults with youg children - I’ve no issue with this myself as long as they are cycling reasonably slowly. Where possible though the adult should be on the road or walking, though it’s not always possible.

I don’t find there is one particular group that is worst than others, it’s pretty mixed but some ‘groups’ always get highlighted.

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I lived and cycled on Cranston Road for 20 years and never once saw anyone do that.
I saw plenty of cars riding over the pavement up and down the road and on the corner of Woolstone and saw several crashes on that corner so I wouldn’t say cyclists are the biggest problem there.

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