Calling all Cat Spotters of SE23


#175

He is a full NFC he was a stray who turned up in my inlaws garden. Not chipped no one came forward to claim him. So he came to live with us he makes me smile every day.


#176

If he were mine I’d be scouring the streets to find him. They are amazingly characterful cats.


#177

They do seem to be slightly different to your general feline. Ours is quite unlike any other cat I have known - extremely sociable, totally untrainable, doesn’t seem to mind water at all and is a wanderer of great distinction…
@Blindbear - does yours have any idiosyncrasies??


#178

I had a Maine Coon, which are very similar in personality to NFCs. Sort of like an aloof dog, but extremely loyal and occasionally knowingly goofy. Mine would meet me at the end of the road when I came back from work and ‘talk’ to me as we strolled down the street. We had to rehome him when we went to live aboard. After three years I visited him - he looked at me, then sat in front of me with his back turned. Until everyone else left the room, when he sidled up and leaned against me. God, I miss that cat.


#179

What is an NFC?

PS… tried to post NFC = ? Apparently the software double as grammar police.

Body seems unclear, is it a complete sentence?


#180

NFC = Norwegian forest cat

Exactly!


#181

He is a very sociable and chatty we get a full run down of what he has been up to when he comes through the cat flap. Loves water and climbing trees. And uses Jedi mind tricks to get us to open the loft for him.


#182

Last one


#183

@Foresthillnick you may want to check Basil’s paws before you let him in the house if the pawprints in our newly-laid conservatory screed base and description of the culprit by our floorer is anything to go by.


#184

So dont throw him in the sea??


#185

Best not to, cod numbers are bad enough already :wink:


#186

Now that I think I’ve puss-proofed our back garden so our two housecats can have a little wander, I had the back door open to deal with this awful heat. I was working away in our living room when I saw a large grey cat out of the corner of my eye. Given ours are Russian Blues, I assumed it was our boy, until I looked properly and saw the stripes. It seems the Fog-Coloured Cat is getting very bold! I’m used to Gulliver walking in, but it seems there’s a new Top Cat in town.


#187

@FaeryCatmother. What system did you use for puss proofing?


#188

We’ve got trellising on the top of the fences that is a bit too wobbly for them, plus I blocked off access in other spots with expanding trellising. It probably wouldn’t work for adventurous cats, but our two have lived indoors for years so they are easily put off.

I was originally thinking of getting this: https://oscillot.com.au/ which friends in Oz say is brilliant, but my low tech version works just as well here. Perhaps when we move to the country one day.


#189

Thanks. At my old house I had a much smaller outdoor space. I replaced the fences with 6 ft trellis and then used garden netting angled inwards. It worked a treat. But not the nicest to look at.


#190

Close the doors and the windows and the curtains. All you’re doing is letting the heat in. Open them again about 8pm.


#191

Nah - that doesn’t work as well in this kind of heat. The most effective way to cool a house when the relative humidity is higher is create cross ventilation by opening doors/windows on both sides of the building.


#192

That’s what I do morning and evening, but shut up the house mid afternoon, especially when there is not wind.


#193

If you open up both sides you’ll pick up even slight breezes. It’s relatively still today, but I have to keep both doors blocked open because of the cross-breezes.

My other half tended to go with the closing up the house approach too, but I convinced up to take the approach from the tropics when we tested temp differences with both ways of doing it.

The closing up approach works better if the RH is below 45%, or if you’re blocked in by so many tall buildings you’re effectively cut off from any breeze. Although I’m inclined to think there’s a psychosomatic element too - if you grew up in hot countries, dark rooms are associated with hotter conditions, but here I gather it’s more likely to be associated with coolness.


#194

At least my method keeps the bold cats out. :wink: